• Hydrothermal Vents

    Bill Nye discusses the discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean's floor

    published: 25 Aug 2008
  • Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

    In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0

    published: 05 Apr 2013
  • Hydrothermal Vents

    One of the strangest ecosystems on earth lies deep under the ocean.

    published: 19 Sep 2008
  • Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

    Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist resea...

    published: 30 Mar 2014
  • Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

    While exploring near the Galapagos Islands, the team of E/V Nautilus discovered a huge "black smoker" hydrothermal vent more than 10 meters tall billowing a cloud of dark superheated fluid and teeming with strange life. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.

    published: 14 Jul 2015
  • Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

    In the darkness of special places like the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents, ocean research is bringing to light deep secrets about life on earth and potentially elsewhere in our universe. “Black Smokers” and hydrothermal vents create an ecologically-rich oasis in the deep sea where chemosynthetic creatures thrive and chemicals provide life-sustaining energy. At a depth of over 2 km, the management of Canada’s first Oceans Act Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents is challenging. An organism from this site holds the current record for the upper temperature limit to life: 121 degrees Celsius! Scientists strive to uncover secrets of the formation of Earth’s tectonic plates, chemosynthetic food webs and a potential glimpse of the origins of life on our planet, and perhap...

    published: 01 Jun 2016
  • Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

    During a recent expedition to the Gulf of California scientists from MBARI discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, the deepest yet discovered in the Gulf of California. These new hydrothermal vent fields were found over thirty-eight hundred meters below the surface in the Pescadero Basin, located off the east coast of Mexico’s Baja California, about one hundred miles east of La Paz. These hydrothermal vents result from a unique combination of geology and chemistry. Using a remotely operated vehicle, researchers found towering white columns emitting geysers of clear shimmering liquid with temperatures up to 290 degrees Celsius. The superheated water flowing from these vents starts deep underground. As the hot water rises, it flows through and reacts with the surrounding bedrock, becom...

    published: 02 Jun 2015
  • Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

    On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okea...

    published: 02 Aug 2011
  • Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

    While exploring near the Galapagos, the team of E/V Nautilus encountered some beautiful creatures, including the Flamboyant Squid Worm, a species just discovered in 2007. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.

    published: 13 Jun 2015
  • The Depths Below: Life on a Vent

    The earth cracks open. Fluid and minerals spew up from the seafloor. Water shimmers. Life abounds. We're looking at hydrothermal vents, originally discovered near the Galapagos Rift in 1977. Basically, a hydrothermal vent is a hot spring produced by underwater volcanoes or tectonic activity. But what's really cool about them is the abundance and assortment of life that exists there. It's not life like we're used to up here on the surface -- it's adapted to the dark conditions of the deep ocean. Organisms that live around hydrothermal vents don't rely on sunlight and photosynthesis. Instead, bacteria and archaea use a process called chemosynthesis to convert minerals and other chemicals in the water into energy. This bacterium is the base of the vent community food web, and suppo...

    published: 21 Feb 2014
  • Hydrothermal Vent Creatures Smithsonian Ocean Portal

    published: 24 Jul 2014
Hydrothermal Vents

Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:24
  • Updated: 25 Aug 2008
  • views: 180799
videos
Bill Nye discusses the discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean's floor
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents
Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:23
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2013
  • views: 48639
videos
In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_In_The_Deep_Sea
Hydrothermal Vents

Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:53
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2008
  • views: 76124
videos
One of the strangest ecosystems on earth lies deep under the ocean.
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents
Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:59
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2014
  • views: 2787
videos
Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist researcher, Dr Jon Copley, talks through his experiences with Hydrothermal Vents and how irresponsible and short-sighted mining practices may have potentially catastrophic consequences on an ecosystem we still do not fully understand.
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_What_Does_The_Future_Hold
Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 14 Jul 2015
  • views: 10893
videos
While exploring near the Galapagos Islands, the team of E/V Nautilus discovered a huge "black smoker" hydrothermal vent more than 10 meters tall billowing a cloud of dark superheated fluid and teeming with strange life. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.
https://wn.com/Giant_Black_Smoker_Hydrothermal_Vent_|_Nautilus_Live
Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:47
  • Updated: 01 Jun 2016
  • views: 2138
videos
In the darkness of special places like the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents, ocean research is bringing to light deep secrets about life on earth and potentially elsewhere in our universe. “Black Smokers” and hydrothermal vents create an ecologically-rich oasis in the deep sea where chemosynthetic creatures thrive and chemicals provide life-sustaining energy. At a depth of over 2 km, the management of Canada’s first Oceans Act Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents is challenging. An organism from this site holds the current record for the upper temperature limit to life: 121 degrees Celsius! Scientists strive to uncover secrets of the formation of Earth’s tectonic plates, chemosynthetic food webs and a potential glimpse of the origins of life on our planet, and perhaps its origins on others. In 2013, Fisheries and Oceans Canada who is responsible for managing Canada’s MPA’s, began collaborating with Ocean Networks Canada who has been operating a world-leading cabled observatory at Endeavour since 2009. ________________ We hope that you enjoyed the video! Check out the Ocean Networks Canada website to discover the ocean to understand the planet! http://www.oceannetworks.ca Want to see what we're up to? Follow us on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ocean_networks And FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/OceanNetworksCanada INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/ocean_networks FLICKR: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oceannetworkscanada/albums
https://wn.com/Endeavour_Hydrothermal_Vents
Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:51
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2015
  • views: 25250
videos
During a recent expedition to the Gulf of California scientists from MBARI discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, the deepest yet discovered in the Gulf of California. These new hydrothermal vent fields were found over thirty-eight hundred meters below the surface in the Pescadero Basin, located off the east coast of Mexico’s Baja California, about one hundred miles east of La Paz. These hydrothermal vents result from a unique combination of geology and chemistry. Using a remotely operated vehicle, researchers found towering white columns emitting geysers of clear shimmering liquid with temperatures up to 290 degrees Celsius. The superheated water flowing from these vents starts deep underground. As the hot water rises, it flows through and reacts with the surrounding bedrock, becoming saturated with carbonate minerals, which build up over time to form the large chimneys that were observed. For more information go to MBARI news release: http://www.mbari.org/news/news_releases/2015/pescadero/pescadero-release.html
https://wn.com/Pescadero_Basin_Deepest_Hydrothermal_Vents_In_The_Gulf_Of_California
Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:43
  • Updated: 02 Aug 2011
  • views: 71758
videos
On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Galapágos Rift Expedition 2011. Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1103/welcome.html
https://wn.com/Galápagos_Rift_2011_New_Hydrothermal_Vent_Discovered
Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:44
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2015
  • views: 77069
videos
While exploring near the Galapagos, the team of E/V Nautilus encountered some beautiful creatures, including the Flamboyant Squid Worm, a species just discovered in 2007. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.
https://wn.com/Amazing_Creatures_Of_Galapagos_Hydrothermal_Vents_|_Nautilus_Live
The Depths Below: Life on a Vent

The Depths Below: Life on a Vent

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:31
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2014
  • views: 3297
videos
The earth cracks open. Fluid and minerals spew up from the seafloor. Water shimmers. Life abounds. We're looking at hydrothermal vents, originally discovered near the Galapagos Rift in 1977. Basically, a hydrothermal vent is a hot spring produced by underwater volcanoes or tectonic activity. But what's really cool about them is the abundance and assortment of life that exists there. It's not life like we're used to up here on the surface -- it's adapted to the dark conditions of the deep ocean. Organisms that live around hydrothermal vents don't rely on sunlight and photosynthesis. Instead, bacteria and archaea use a process called chemosynthesis to convert minerals and other chemicals in the water into energy. This bacterium is the base of the vent community food web, and supports hundreds of species of animals. What kinds of animals? Well, scientists on the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer went to the rift in twenty-eleven. And here's just some of what they saw. Riftia tube worms, also called giant tube worms, which can grow to their full size of almost five feet long in less than two years. Bathymodiolus deep sea mussels, which are often the first creatures to colonize the vent and are able to survive for a short time after the vent is inactive. Serpulid, or "feather duster" worms, and tevnia tubeworms, which are often the food of choice for vent crabs, the top predator of the vent community. But it's not all animals down there. Researchers also saw white flocculent material erupting from the vents like a snowblower - an indicator of microbial life beneath the seafloor. And of course, there were the fresh lava flows, which means the seafloor is continuing to change. And that change, means there's always more to learn. So join us, as we continue to explore The Depths Below. Links: NOAA Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research: http://www.research.noaa.gov/ NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research: http://explore.noaa.gov/ NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory: http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/
https://wn.com/The_Depths_Below_Life_On_A_Vent
Hydrothermal Vent Creatures  Smithsonian Ocean Portal

Hydrothermal Vent Creatures Smithsonian Ocean Portal

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 24 Jul 2014
  • views: 1978
videos
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vent_Creatures_Smithsonian_Ocean_Portal
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