• Hydrothermal Vents

    Bill Nye discusses the discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean's floor

    published: 25 Aug 2008
  • Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

    While exploring near the Galapagos Islands, the team of E/V Nautilus discovered a huge "black smoker" hydrothermal vent more than 10 meters tall billowing a cloud of dark superheated fluid and teeming with strange life. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.

    published: 14 Jul 2015
  • Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

    In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0

    published: 05 Apr 2013
  • Hydrothermal Vents

    One of the strangest ecosystems on earth lies deep under the ocean.

    published: 19 Sep 2008
  • Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

    Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist resea...

    published: 30 Mar 2014
  • Weird Worms Live Near Pacific Ocean’s Deepest High-Temp Vent | National Geographic

    Scientists have discovered the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean, located in the Gulf of California's Pescadero Basin. It sits nearly 12,500 feet (3,800 meters) below the surface. Experts think the high temperatures may cook organic material in the overlying mud into petroleum-like products. Samples of the chimney stacks have the stench of diesel fuel, but creatures like the tubeworms shown in this footage are undeterred. They cling to rocks near carbonate chimneys that emerge from a flat, muddy seafloor. The footage was captured using a remotely operated vehicle. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scient...

    published: 11 Jun 2015
  • How Giant Tube Worms Survive at Hydrothermal Vents | I Contain Multitudes

    Deep at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, an amazing bacterial discovery reshaped our view of life on earth. Anatomy of a tube worm: https://medium.com/hhmi-science-media/anatomy-of-a-giant-tube-worm-fe779af23975 Archaea 101: https://medium.com/hhmi-science-media/microbes-101-archaea-8148b5f45bda In 1977, three people squeezed into a sturdy little submersible named “Alvin” and dived 7,500 feet to the bottom of the Pacific. The team was looking for something that had been predicted for years but had never actually been seen: deep-sea hydrothermal vents. These jets of volcanically superheated water would be caused by two continental plates pulling away from each other on the ocean floor. The Alvin crew found the vents, but they also saw something else that took them completely by surprise....

    published: 13 Nov 2017
  • The Depths Below - Life on a Vent

    The earth cracks open. Fluid and minerals spew up from the seafloor. Water shimmers. Life abounds. We're looking at hydrothermal vents, originally discovered near the Galapagos Rift in 1977. Basically, a hydrothermal vent is a hot spring produced by underwater volcanoes or tectonic activity. Original video source: http://oceantoday.noaa.gov/lifeonavent/welcome.html Ocean Today is an interactive exhibit that plays short videos on ocean related themes. Visitors can select from 150+ videos on topics ranging from deep-­‐sea exploration, marine species, and restoration projects to hurricanes, oceans and human health, and climate science and research. These videos are a free resource and are available on our website at oceantoday.noaa.gov.

    published: 28 May 2015
  • Marine Chemistry: Hydrothermal Vents

    AP Chemistry Mrs. Rockholz

    published: 20 May 2016
  • Hydrothermal Vents

    Brief review of the processes at work at hydrothermal vents. Developed for an introductory-level Earth Science Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks Part of a 7-part Plate Tectonics video series: Part 1: Earth Layers & Isostasy Part 2: Plate Tectonics Basics Part 3: Plate Tectonics Global Impacts Part 4: Plate Tectonics and California Geology Part 5: Hotspots Part 6: Paleomagnetism Part 7: Hydrothermal Vents

    published: 16 Jan 2015
  • Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

    Scientists think studying 'extremophiles' in toxic hydrothermal vents could teach us about potential extraterrestrial life. Why Does Deep Sea Life Look So Strange? - https://youtu.be/A23wI4lvCgY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Get 15% off http://www.domain.com domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code SEEKER at checkout! Read More: What is a hydrothermal vent? http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html "Scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in 1977 while exploring an oceanic spreading ridge near the Galapagos Islands. To their amazement, the scientists also found that the hydrothermal vents were surrounded by large numbers of organisms that had never been seen before." Deepest Hydrothermal Vents Teem With Strange ...

    published: 12 Mar 2017
  • Hydrothermal vent

    The thing that happens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    published: 11 Mar 2013
  • Hydrothermal Vent Creatures Smithsonian Ocean Portal

    published: 24 Jul 2014
  • Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

    In the darkness of special places like the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents, ocean research is bringing to light deep secrets about life on earth and potentially elsewhere in our universe. “Black Smokers” and hydrothermal vents create an ecologically-rich oasis in the deep sea where chemosynthetic creatures thrive and chemicals provide life-sustaining energy. At a depth of over 2 km, the management of Canada’s first Oceans Act Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents is challenging. An organism from this site holds the current record for the upper temperature limit to life: 121 degrees Celsius! Scientists strive to uncover secrets of the formation of Earth’s tectonic plates, chemosynthetic food webs and a potential glimpse of the origins of life on our planet, and perhap...

    published: 01 Jun 2016
  • Rare Video: Deep-Sea Creature Incubates Eggs on Hydrothermal Vents | National Geographic

    In the depths of the Galápagos Marine Reserve, scientists discovered oddly shaped eggs sitting on a hydrothermal vent. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta The eggs belong to deep-sea skates, a relative of the shark. Scientists believe that skates are laying eggs on these vents for a reason. Hydrothermal vents...

    published: 14 Feb 2018
  • Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

    On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okea...

    published: 02 Aug 2011
  • What is HYDROTHERMAL VENT? What does HYDROTHERMAL VENT mean? HYDROTHERMAL VENT meaning

    What is HYDROTHERMAL VENT? What does HYDROTHERMAL VENT mean? HYDROTHERMAL VENT meaning - HYDROTHERMAL VENT definition - HYDROTHERMAL VENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A hydrothermal vent is a fissure in a planet's surface from which geothermally heated water issues. Hydrothermal vents are commonly found near volcanically active places, areas where tectonic plates are moving apart, ocean basins, and hotspots. Hydrothermal vents exist because the earth is both geologically active and has large amounts of water on its surface and within its crust. Common land types include hot springs, fumaroles and geysers. Under the sea, hydrothermal vents may form features called black smokers. Relative to the majority ...

    published: 10 Feb 2017
  • Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

    While exploring near the Galapagos, the team of E/V Nautilus encountered some beautiful creatures, including the Flamboyant Squid Worm, a species just discovered in 2007. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.

    published: 13 Jun 2015
  • Volcanic springs and hydro-thermal vents | BBC

    What fuelled life on Earth some 4,000 billion years ago? From the billions of organisms that live in the toxic chemicals of volcanic springs to the super-hot hydro-thermal vents deep in the oceans, Dr Iain Stewart investigates in the ground-breaking and award-winning BBC series Earth: The Power of the Planet. Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos and watch more high quality videos on the new BBC Earth YouTube channel here: http://www.youtube.com/bbcearth

    published: 19 Apr 2010
  • Hydrothermal Vents: 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

    This incredible active hydrothermal vent was imaged for the first time during the 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas expedition. It was 30 meters high and gushing high-temperature fluid full of metal particulates. This vent was home to many different species, including Chorocaris shrimp, Munidopsis squat lobsters, Austinograea crabs, limpets, mussels, and snails. Video courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas. Learn more about the expedition here: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/welcome.html

    published: 25 Aug 2017
  • Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

    During a recent expedition to the Gulf of California scientists from MBARI discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, the deepest yet discovered in the Gulf of California. These new hydrothermal vent fields were found over thirty-eight hundred meters below the surface in the Pescadero Basin, located off the east coast of Mexico’s Baja California, about one hundred miles east of La Paz. These hydrothermal vents result from a unique combination of geology and chemistry. Using a remotely operated vehicle, researchers found towering white columns emitting geysers of clear shimmering liquid with temperatures up to 290 degrees Celsius. The superheated water flowing from these vents starts deep underground. As the hot water rises, it flows through and reacts with the surrounding bedrock, becom...

    published: 02 Jun 2015
  • Measuring Active Hydrothermal Vents in Galapagos | Nautilus Live

    Led by Dr. Robert Ballard, ROV pilots operate the dextrous robotic submersible Hercules to insert a temperature probe into a hydrothermal vent near the Galapagos Islands. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.

    published: 16 Jun 2015
  • WHOI: Hydrothermal Vents

    WHOI scientist Susan Humphris explains what hydrothermal vents are and why they're important.

    published: 30 Oct 2008
  • Hydrothermal vent fields 1080p

    published: 20 Jun 2016
developed with YouTube
Hydrothermal Vents

Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:24
  • Updated: 25 Aug 2008
  • views: 226283
videos
Bill Nye discusses the discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean's floor
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents
Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

Giant Black Smoker Hydrothermal Vent | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:49
  • Updated: 14 Jul 2015
  • views: 38670
videos
While exploring near the Galapagos Islands, the team of E/V Nautilus discovered a huge "black smoker" hydrothermal vent more than 10 meters tall billowing a cloud of dark superheated fluid and teeming with strange life. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.
https://wn.com/Giant_Black_Smoker_Hydrothermal_Vent_|_Nautilus_Live
Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

Hydrothermal vents in the deep sea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:23
  • Updated: 05 Apr 2013
  • views: 92733
videos
In many areas of high volcanic activity, water seeps into the sub-surface where it is intensely heated and then finds its way to the surface again. Examples on the land include hot springs in therapeutic spas, and special types like geysers and fumaroles. In the ocean, this circulation occurs most commonly at the mid-ocean ridge, the world's longest mountain chain. Here, far below the depth of sunlight penetration, hydrothermal vents at over 400°C with their dissolved compounds provide the basis for complex ecosystems. Music: Sebastian Rahe German version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39tDf5r2no0
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_In_The_Deep_Sea
Hydrothermal Vents

Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:53
  • Updated: 19 Sep 2008
  • views: 90784
videos
One of the strangest ecosystems on earth lies deep under the ocean.
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents
Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:59
  • Updated: 30 Mar 2014
  • views: 5571
videos
Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist researcher, Dr Jon Copley, talks through his experiences with Hydrothermal Vents and how irresponsible and short-sighted mining practices may have potentially catastrophic consequences on an ecosystem we still do not fully understand.
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_What_Does_The_Future_Hold
Weird Worms Live Near Pacific Ocean’s Deepest High-Temp Vent | National Geographic

Weird Worms Live Near Pacific Ocean’s Deepest High-Temp Vent | National Geographic

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:46
  • Updated: 11 Jun 2015
  • views: 19984
videos
Scientists have discovered the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean, located in the Gulf of California's Pescadero Basin. It sits nearly 12,500 feet (3,800 meters) below the surface. Experts think the high temperatures may cook organic material in the overlying mud into petroleum-like products. Samples of the chimney stacks have the stench of diesel fuel, but creatures like the tubeworms shown in this footage are undeterred. They cling to rocks near carbonate chimneys that emerge from a flat, muddy seafloor. The footage was captured using a remotely operated vehicle. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta VIDEO: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Associate Producer: Jed Winer Weird Worms Live Near Pacific Ocean’s Deepest High-Temp Vent | National Geographic https://youtu.be/qK5dXMHSIu8 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
https://wn.com/Weird_Worms_Live_Near_Pacific_Ocean’S_Deepest_High_Temp_Vent_|_National_Geographic
How Giant Tube Worms Survive at Hydrothermal Vents | I Contain Multitudes

How Giant Tube Worms Survive at Hydrothermal Vents | I Contain Multitudes

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:21
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2017
  • views: 6721
videos
Deep at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, an amazing bacterial discovery reshaped our view of life on earth. Anatomy of a tube worm: https://medium.com/hhmi-science-media/anatomy-of-a-giant-tube-worm-fe779af23975 Archaea 101: https://medium.com/hhmi-science-media/microbes-101-archaea-8148b5f45bda In 1977, three people squeezed into a sturdy little submersible named “Alvin” and dived 7,500 feet to the bottom of the Pacific. The team was looking for something that had been predicted for years but had never actually been seen: deep-sea hydrothermal vents. These jets of volcanically superheated water would be caused by two continental plates pulling away from each other on the ocean floor. The Alvin crew found the vents, but they also saw something else that took them completely by surprise. They had expected a barren sunless world on the ocean floor, but instead found one that teemed with life—a menagerie that included the giant tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, that can grow taller than a person. In this episode, Ed talks to Colleen Cavanaugh and finds out how the tubeworm can live in complete darkness and, more curiously, without even having a mouth or anus. In a process called chemosynthesis, symbiotic bacteria inside the tubeworm use hydrogen sulfide spewed from the vents as an energy source for themselves and for the worms. An entire unexpected ecosystem powered by chemosynthesis thrives in the dark depths of the ocean. Subscribe for more episodes every Monday! And don't forget to find us on Facebook or Medium for articles and infographics that explore beyond each episode: On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HHMIsciencemedia/ On Medium: https://medium.com/hhmi-science-media And if you're curious about the microbiome, feel free to send questions to @edyong209 or @tangledbankHHMI on Twitter!
https://wn.com/How_Giant_Tube_Worms_Survive_At_Hydrothermal_Vents_|_I_Contain_Multitudes
The Depths Below - Life on a Vent

The Depths Below - Life on a Vent

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:31
  • Updated: 28 May 2015
  • views: 1134
videos
The earth cracks open. Fluid and minerals spew up from the seafloor. Water shimmers. Life abounds. We're looking at hydrothermal vents, originally discovered near the Galapagos Rift in 1977. Basically, a hydrothermal vent is a hot spring produced by underwater volcanoes or tectonic activity. Original video source: http://oceantoday.noaa.gov/lifeonavent/welcome.html Ocean Today is an interactive exhibit that plays short videos on ocean related themes. Visitors can select from 150+ videos on topics ranging from deep-­‐sea exploration, marine species, and restoration projects to hurricanes, oceans and human health, and climate science and research. These videos are a free resource and are available on our website at oceantoday.noaa.gov.
https://wn.com/The_Depths_Below_Life_On_A_Vent
Marine Chemistry: Hydrothermal Vents

Marine Chemistry: Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:15
  • Updated: 20 May 2016
  • views: 778
videos https://wn.com/Marine_Chemistry_Hydrothermal_Vents
Hydrothermal Vents

Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:14
  • Updated: 16 Jan 2015
  • views: 3802
videos
Brief review of the processes at work at hydrothermal vents. Developed for an introductory-level Earth Science Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks Part of a 7-part Plate Tectonics video series: Part 1: Earth Layers & Isostasy Part 2: Plate Tectonics Basics Part 3: Plate Tectonics Global Impacts Part 4: Plate Tectonics and California Geology Part 5: Hotspots Part 6: Paleomagnetism Part 7: Hydrothermal Vents
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents
Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:58
  • Updated: 12 Mar 2017
  • views: 88092
videos
Scientists think studying 'extremophiles' in toxic hydrothermal vents could teach us about potential extraterrestrial life. Why Does Deep Sea Life Look So Strange? - https://youtu.be/A23wI4lvCgY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Get 15% off http://www.domain.com domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code SEEKER at checkout! Read More: What is a hydrothermal vent? http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html "Scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in 1977 while exploring an oceanic spreading ridge near the Galapagos Islands. To their amazement, the scientists also found that the hydrothermal vents were surrounded by large numbers of organisms that had never been seen before." Deepest Hydrothermal Vents Teem With Strange Shrimp http://www.livescience.com/17823-deepest-hydrothermal-vents.html "Researchers exploring the seafloor south of the Cayman Islands have discovered the world's deepest-known hydrothermal vents, an underwater hotspot teeming with bizarre shrimp with light receptors on their backs." Just How Little Do We Know about the Ocean Floor? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/just-how-little-do-we-know-about-the-ocean-floor/ "The entire ocean floor has now been mapped to a maximum resolution of around 5km, which means we can see most features larger than 5km across in those maps. That's the resolution of a new global map of the seafloor published recently by David Sandwell of Scripps Institute of Oceanography in San Diego and colleagues, who used some nifty tricks with satellites to estimate the landscape of the sea floor and even reveal some features of the Earth's crust lurking beneath sea-floor sediments." ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Watch More Seeker on our website http://www.seeker.com/shows/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Lauren Ellis
https://wn.com/Ocean_Volcanoes_May_Hold_Clues_To_Alien_Life
Hydrothermal vent

Hydrothermal vent

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:54
  • Updated: 11 Mar 2013
  • views: 431
videos
The thing that happens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent.
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vent
Hydrothermal Vent Creatures  Smithsonian Ocean Portal

Hydrothermal Vent Creatures Smithsonian Ocean Portal

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:27
  • Updated: 24 Jul 2014
  • views: 5098
videos
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vent_Creatures_Smithsonian_Ocean_Portal
Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:47
  • Updated: 01 Jun 2016
  • views: 7928
videos
In the darkness of special places like the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents, ocean research is bringing to light deep secrets about life on earth and potentially elsewhere in our universe. “Black Smokers” and hydrothermal vents create an ecologically-rich oasis in the deep sea where chemosynthetic creatures thrive and chemicals provide life-sustaining energy. At a depth of over 2 km, the management of Canada’s first Oceans Act Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents is challenging. An organism from this site holds the current record for the upper temperature limit to life: 121 degrees Celsius! Scientists strive to uncover secrets of the formation of Earth’s tectonic plates, chemosynthetic food webs and a potential glimpse of the origins of life on our planet, and perhaps its origins on others. In 2013, Fisheries and Oceans Canada who is responsible for managing Canada’s MPA’s, began collaborating with Ocean Networks Canada who has been operating a world-leading cabled observatory at Endeavour since 2009. ________________ We hope that you enjoyed the video! Check out the Ocean Networks Canada website to discover the ocean to understand the planet! http://www.oceannetworks.ca Want to see what we're up to? Follow us on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ocean_networks And FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/OceanNetworksCanada INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/ocean_networks FLICKR: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oceannetworkscanada/albums
https://wn.com/Endeavour_Hydrothermal_Vents
Rare Video: Deep-Sea Creature Incubates Eggs on Hydrothermal Vents | National Geographic

Rare Video: Deep-Sea Creature Incubates Eggs on Hydrothermal Vents | National Geographic

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:47
  • Updated: 14 Feb 2018
  • views: 1640
videos
In the depths of the Galápagos Marine Reserve, scientists discovered oddly shaped eggs sitting on a hydrothermal vent. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta The eggs belong to deep-sea skates, a relative of the shark. Scientists believe that skates are laying eggs on these vents for a reason. Hydrothermal vents are places where super-heated water erupts out of the sea floor, usually where tectonic plates meet. The water can exceed temperatures of 750° Fahrenheit, providing pockets of heat in an otherwise cold, deep-sea environment. In the cold waters of the deep sea, eggs take much longer to incubate. When eggs are placed near a hydrothermal vent, the heat speeds up the incubation process by months or years. Read more in "This Deep-Sea Creature Lays Its Eggs on Hydrothermal Vents—A First" https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/02/Pacific-white-skate-eggs-hydrothermal-vents-animals Rare Video: Deep-Sea Creature Incubates Eggs on Hydrothermal Vents | National Geographic https://youtu.be/LssEZLFuVnA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
https://wn.com/Rare_Video_Deep_Sea_Creature_Incubates_Eggs_On_Hydrothermal_Vents_|_National_Geographic
Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

Galápagos Rift 2011: New Hydrothermal Vent Discovered

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:43
  • Updated: 02 Aug 2011
  • views: 86835
videos
On the ninth remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the Galapágos Rift 2011 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, the science team finally discovered the type of hydrothermal vent community they had been searching for. Clusters of tube worms, limpets, mussels, and anemones were seen to inhabit cracks in the lava bed where mineral-rich, geothermally heated water 'vents' out. Two species of tube worms were found in abundance: the giant Riftia pachyptila and also the much smaller, never observed in the Galápagos, Tevnia jerichonana. Brachyuran crabs, vent shrimp, and scale worms clung not only to the surrounding rock but also to the tube worms themselves in some cases. Extensive fields of dead and living clams surrounded the individual pockets of venting. Video courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Galapágos Rift Expedition 2011. Source: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1103/welcome.html
https://wn.com/Galápagos_Rift_2011_New_Hydrothermal_Vent_Discovered
What is HYDROTHERMAL VENT? What does HYDROTHERMAL VENT mean? HYDROTHERMAL VENT meaning

What is HYDROTHERMAL VENT? What does HYDROTHERMAL VENT mean? HYDROTHERMAL VENT meaning

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 10 Feb 2017
  • views: 943
videos
What is HYDROTHERMAL VENT? What does HYDROTHERMAL VENT mean? HYDROTHERMAL VENT meaning - HYDROTHERMAL VENT definition - HYDROTHERMAL VENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A hydrothermal vent is a fissure in a planet's surface from which geothermally heated water issues. Hydrothermal vents are commonly found near volcanically active places, areas where tectonic plates are moving apart, ocean basins, and hotspots. Hydrothermal vents exist because the earth is both geologically active and has large amounts of water on its surface and within its crust. Common land types include hot springs, fumaroles and geysers. Under the sea, hydrothermal vents may form features called black smokers. Relative to the majority of the deep sea, the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents are biologically more productive, often hosting complex communities fueled by the chemicals dissolved in the vent fluids. Chemosynthetic bacteria and archaea form the base of the food chain, supporting diverse organisms, including giant tube worms, clams, limpets and shrimp. Active hydrothermal vents are believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, and Saturn's moon Enceladus, and it is speculated that ancient hydrothermal vents once existed on Mars. Hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean typically form along the mid-ocean ridges, such as the East Pacific Rise and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These are locations where two tectonic plates are diverging and new crust is being formed. The water that issues from seafloor hydrothermal vents consists mostly of sea water drawn into the hydrothermal system close to the volcanic edifice through faults and porous sediments or volcanic strata, plus some magmatic water released by the upwelling magma. In terrestrial hydrothermal systems, the majority of water circulated within the fumarole and geyser systems is meteoric water plus ground water that has percolated down into the thermal system from the surface, but it also commonly contains some portion of metamorphic water, magmatic water, and sedimentary formational brine that is released by the magma. The proportion of each varies from location to location. In contrast to the approximately 2 °C ambient water temperature at these depths, water emerges from these vents at temperatures ranging from 60 to as high as 464 °C. Due to the high hydrostatic pressure at these depths, water may exist in either its liquid form or as a supercritical fluid at such temperatures. The critical point of (pure) water is 375 °C at a pressure of 218 atmospheres. However, introducing salinity into the fluid raises the critical point to higher temperatures and pressures. The critical point of seawater (3.2 wt. % NaCl) is 407 °C and 298.5 bars, corresponding to a depth of ~2960 m below sea level. Accordingly, if a hydrothermal fluid with a salinity of 3.2 wt. % NaCl vents above 407 °C and 298.5 bars, it is supercritical. Furthermore, the salinity of vent fluids have been shown to vary widely due to phase separation in the crust. The critical point for lower salinity fluids is at lower temperature and pressure conditions than that for seawater, but higher than that for pure water. For example, a vent fluid with a 2.24 wt. % NaCl salinity has the critical point at 400 °C and 280.5 bars. Thus, water emerging from the hottest parts of some hydrothermal vents can be a supercritical fluid, possessing physical properties between those of a gas and those of a liquid. Examples of supercritical venting are found at several sites. Sister Peak (Comfortless Cove Hydrothermal Field, 4°48'S 12°22'W, elevation -2996 m) vents low salinity phase-separated, vapor-type fluids. Sustained venting was not found to be supercritical but a brief injection of 464 °C was well above supercritical conditions. A nearby site, Turtle Pits, was found to vent low salinity fluid at 407 °C, which is above the critical point of the fluid at that salinity. A vent site in the Cayman Trough named Beebe, which is the world's deepest known hydrothermal site at ~5000 m below sea level, has shown sustained supercritical venting at 401 °C and 2.3 wt% NaCl. Although supercritical conditions have been observed at several sites, it is not yet known what significance, if any, supercritical venting has in terms of hydrothermal circulation, mineral deposit formation, geochemical fluxes or biological activity.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Hydrothermal_Vent_What_Does_Hydrothermal_Vent_Mean_Hydrothermal_Vent_Meaning
Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

Amazing Creatures of Galapagos Hydrothermal Vents | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:44
  • Updated: 13 Jun 2015
  • views: 82695
videos
While exploring near the Galapagos, the team of E/V Nautilus encountered some beautiful creatures, including the Flamboyant Squid Worm, a species just discovered in 2007. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.
https://wn.com/Amazing_Creatures_Of_Galapagos_Hydrothermal_Vents_|_Nautilus_Live
Volcanic springs and hydro-thermal vents | BBC

Volcanic springs and hydro-thermal vents | BBC

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:52
  • Updated: 19 Apr 2010
  • views: 8751
videos
What fuelled life on Earth some 4,000 billion years ago? From the billions of organisms that live in the toxic chemicals of volcanic springs to the super-hot hydro-thermal vents deep in the oceans, Dr Iain Stewart investigates in the ground-breaking and award-winning BBC series Earth: The Power of the Planet. Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos and watch more high quality videos on the new BBC Earth YouTube channel here: http://www.youtube.com/bbcearth
https://wn.com/Volcanic_Springs_And_Hydro_Thermal_Vents_|_BBC
Hydrothermal Vents: 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

Hydrothermal Vents: 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:06
  • Updated: 25 Aug 2017
  • views: 4696
videos
This incredible active hydrothermal vent was imaged for the first time during the 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas expedition. It was 30 meters high and gushing high-temperature fluid full of metal particulates. This vent was home to many different species, including Chorocaris shrimp, Munidopsis squat lobsters, Austinograea crabs, limpets, mussels, and snails. Video courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas. Learn more about the expedition here: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/welcome.html
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vents_2016_Deepwater_Exploration_Of_The_Marianas
Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:51
  • Updated: 02 Jun 2015
  • views: 31061
videos
During a recent expedition to the Gulf of California scientists from MBARI discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, the deepest yet discovered in the Gulf of California. These new hydrothermal vent fields were found over thirty-eight hundred meters below the surface in the Pescadero Basin, located off the east coast of Mexico’s Baja California, about one hundred miles east of La Paz. These hydrothermal vents result from a unique combination of geology and chemistry. Using a remotely operated vehicle, researchers found towering white columns emitting geysers of clear shimmering liquid with temperatures up to 290 degrees Celsius. The superheated water flowing from these vents starts deep underground. As the hot water rises, it flows through and reacts with the surrounding bedrock, becoming saturated with carbonate minerals, which build up over time to form the large chimneys that were observed. For more information go to MBARI news release: http://www.mbari.org/news/news_releases/2015/pescadero/pescadero-release.html
https://wn.com/Pescadero_Basin_Deepest_Hydrothermal_Vents_In_The_Gulf_Of_California
Measuring Active Hydrothermal Vents in Galapagos | Nautilus Live

Measuring Active Hydrothermal Vents in Galapagos | Nautilus Live

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:30
  • Updated: 16 Jun 2015
  • views: 2669
videos
Led by Dr. Robert Ballard, ROV pilots operate the dextrous robotic submersible Hercules to insert a temperature probe into a hydrothermal vent near the Galapagos Islands. E/V Nautilus is exploring the ocean studying biology, geology, archeology, and more. Watch http://www.nautiluslive.org for live video from the ocean floor. For live dive updates follow along on social media at http://www.facebook.com/nautiluslive and http://www.twitter.com/evnautilus on Twitter. For more photos from our dives, check out our Instagram @nautiluslive.
https://wn.com/Measuring_Active_Hydrothermal_Vents_In_Galapagos_|_Nautilus_Live
WHOI: Hydrothermal Vents

WHOI: Hydrothermal Vents

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:54
  • Updated: 30 Oct 2008
  • views: 53382
videos
WHOI scientist Susan Humphris explains what hydrothermal vents are and why they're important.
https://wn.com/Whoi_Hydrothermal_Vents
Hydrothermal vent fields 1080p

Hydrothermal vent fields 1080p

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:38
  • Updated: 20 Jun 2016
  • views: 229
videos
https://wn.com/Hydrothermal_Vent_Fields_1080P